Tails is Free Software, you can download it, use it and share it without restriction.

First time user?

  • If you don't know what a metadata or a man-in-the-middle attack is.
  • If you think no-one can eavesdrop on your communications because you are using Tor.
  • If you have no notion of how Tails works.

Then, check first the about and warning pages to make sure that Tails is the right tool for you and that you understand well its limitations.

Download the ISO image

You will download Tails in the form of an ISO image: a single file that you will later burn on a DVD or install onto a USB stick or SD card.

Direct download

Latest release

Tails 1.5.1 ISO image ( 988 MB / 942 MiB )

Cryptographic signature

Tails 1.5.1 signature

Tails transitioned to a new signing key in Tails 1.3.1.

If you're not sure what the cryptographic signature is, please read the part on verifying the ISO image.

SHA256 checksum

a4c9ac9eca08562a94914230100e6353d07a0f57c017411c95789351b0366198

BitTorrent download

Latest release

Tails 1.5.1 torrent

Cryptographic signature

The cryptographic signature of the ISO image is also included in the Torrent.

Additionally, you can verify the signature of the Torrent file itself before downloading the ISO image.

Seed back!

Seeding back the image once you have downloaded it is also a nice and easy way of helping spread Tails.

List of current known issues in Tails.

Verify the ISO image

It is important to check the integrity of the ISO image you downloaded to make sure that the download went well.

Those techniques rely on standard HTTPS and certificate authorities to make you trust the content of this website. But, as explained on our warning page, you could still be victim of a man-in-the-middle attack while using HTTPS. On this website as much as on any other of the Internet.

As a consequence, they don't provide you with a strong way of checking the ISO image authenticity and making sure you downloaded a genuine Tails. In a dedicated section, we will propose you some more advanced techniques to check the authenticity of the ISO image.

All Tails ISO image are cryptographically signed by our OpenPGP key. OpenPGP is a standard for data encryption that provides cryptographic privacy and authentication through the use of keys owned by its users. Checking this signature is the recommended way of checking the ISO image integrity.

If you already know how to use an OpenPGP key you can download it straight away:

Tails signing key

Otherwise, read our instructions to check the ISO image integrity:

Using Linux with Gnome: Ubuntu, Debian, Tails, Fedora, etc.

Tails transitioned to a new signing key between Tails 1.3 (February 24) and Tails 1.3.1 (March 31). If you had the previous signing key, make sure to import and verify the new signing key.

Install seahorse-nautilus and shared-mime-info

You need to have recent enough versions of the seahorse-nautilus and shared-mime-info packages installed.

These packages are already installed in Tails.

The needed packages are available starting from:

  • Debian version 7 (Wheezy)
  • Ubuntu version 15.04 (Vivid)
In Debian Wheezy, the needed packages are only available as backports. See the setup instructions on the Debian Backports website to add them to your list of repositories. Then, to install the necessary packages, you can execute the following commands:
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install seahorse-nautilus/wheezy-backports shared-mime-info/wheezy-backports
In Debian 8 (Jessie), Ubuntu 15.04 (Vivid), or later, to install the necessary packages, you can execute the following commands:
sudo apt update
sudo apt install seahorse-nautilus

If you are unable to install the necessary packages, try verifying the ISO using the command line.

Get the Tails signing key

If you are using Tails, you already have the signing key. Otherwise, first download Tails signing key:

Tails signing key

Your browser should propose you to open it with "Import Key". Choose this action. It will add Tails signing key to your keyring, the collection of OpenPGP keys you already imported:

What should the web browser do with this
file? Open with: Import Key (default)

You will get notified will the following message:

Key Imported. Imported a key for Tails
developers (offline long-term identity key) <tails@boum.org>

Verify the ISO image

Now, download the cryptographic signature corresponding to the ISO image you want to verify:

Tails 1.5.1 signature

Your browser should propose you to open it with "Verify Signature". Choose this action to start the cryptographic verification:

What should the web browser do
with this file?  Open with: Verify Signature (default)

Browse your files to select the Tails ISO image you want to verify. Then, the verification will start. It can take several minutes:

Verifying

If the ISO image is correct you will get a notification telling you that the signature is good:

Goog Signature

The GNOME notifications appear truncated on Tails 1.1 and later.
See ticket #7249.

If the ISO image is not correct you will get a notification telling you that the signature is bad:

Bad Signature: Bad or forged signature.

Using Linux with the command line

Tails transitioned to a new signing key between Tails 1.3 (February 24) and Tails 1.3.1 (March 31). If you had the previous signing key, make sure to import and verify the new signing key.

You need to have GnuPG installed. GnuPG is the common OpenPGP implementation for Linux: it is installed by default under Debian, Ubuntu, Tails and many other distributions.

Get the Tails signing key

First, download Tails signing key:

Tails signing key

Open a terminal and import Tails signing key with the following commands:

cd [the directory in which you downloaded the key]
gpg --keyid-format long --import tails-signing.key

The output should tell you that the key was imported:

gpg: key DBB802B258ACD84F: public key "Tails developers (offline long-term identity key) <tails@boum.org>" imported
gpg: Total number processed: 1
gpg:               imported: 1  (RSA: 1)

If you had already imported Tails signing key in the past, the output should tell you that the key was not changed:

gpg: key DBB802B258ACD84F: "Tails developers (offline long-term identity key) <tails@boum.org>" not changed
gpg: Total number processed: 1
gpg:              unchanged: 1

If you are shown the following message at the end of the output:

gpg: no ultimately trusted keys found

Analyse the other messages as usual: this extra message doesn't relate to the Tails signing key that you downloaded and usually means that you didn't create an OpenPGP key for yourself yet, which of no importance to verify the ISO image.

Verify the ISO image

Now, download the cryptographic signature corresponding to the ISO image you want to verify and save it in the same folder as the ISO image:

Tails 1.5.1 signature

Then, start the cryptographic verification, it can take several minutes:

cd [the ISO image directory]
gpg --keyid-format long --verify tails-i386-1.5.1.iso.sig tails-i386-1.5.1.iso

If the ISO image is correct the output will tell you that the signature is good:

pg: Signature made Sun 08 Feb 2015 08:17:03 PM UTC
gpg:                using RSA key 3C83DCB52F699C56
gpg: Good signature from "Tails developers (offline long-term identity key) <tails@boum.org>" [unknown]
Primary key fingerprint: A490 D0F4 D311 A415 3E2B  B7CA DBB8 02B2 58AC D84F
     Subkey fingerprint: BA2C 222F 44AC 00ED 9899  3893 98FE C6BC 752A 3DB6

or:

pg: Signature made Sun 08 Feb 2015 08:17:03 PM UTC
gpg:                using RSA key 98FEC6BC752A3DB6
gpg: Good signature from "Tails developers (offline long-term identity key) <tails@boum.org>" [unknown]
Primary key fingerprint: A490 D0F4 D311 A415 3E2B  B7CA DBB8 02B2 58AC D84F
     Subkey fingerprint: A509 1F72 C746 BA6B 163D  1C18 3C83 DCB5 2F69 9C56

If you see the following warning:

gpg: WARNING: This key is not certified with a trusted signature!
gpg:          There is no indication that the signature belongs to the owner.
Primary key fingerprint: A490 D0F4 D311 A415 3E2B  B7CA DBB8 02B2 58AC D84F

Then the ISO image is still correct, and valid according to the Tails signing key that you downloaded. This warning is related to the trust that you put in the Tails signing key. See, Trusting Tails signing key. To remove this warning you would have to personally sign the Tails signing key with your own key.

If the ISO image is not correct the output will tell you that the signature is bad:

gpg: Signature made Sat 30 Apr 2015 10:53:23 AM CEST
gpg:                using RSA key DBB802B258ACD84F
gpg: BAD signature from "Tails developers (offline long-term identity key) <tails@boum.org>"

Using other operating systems

Tails transitioned to a new signing key between Tails 1.3 (February 24) and Tails 1.3.1 (March 31). If you had the previous signing key, make sure to import and verify the new signing key.

GnuPG, a common free software implementation of OpenPGP has versions and graphical frontends for both Windows and Mac OS X. This also make it possible to check the cryptographic signature with those operating systems:

You will find on either of those websites detailed documentation on how to install and use them.

For Windows using Gpg4win

After installing Gpg4win, download Tails signing key:

Tails signing key

Consult the Gpg4win documentation to import it

Then, download the cryptographic signature corresponding to the ISO image you want to verify:

Tails 1.5.1 signature

Consult the Gpg4win documentation to check the signature

If you see the following warning:

Not enough information to check the signature validity.
Signed on ... by tails@boum.org (Key ID: 0x58ACD84F
The validity of the signature cannot be verified.

Then the ISO image is still correct, and valid according to the Tails signing key that you downloaded. This warning is related to the trust that you put in the Tails signing key. See, Trusting Tails signing key. To remove this warning you would have to personally sign the Tails signing key with your own key.

For Mac OS X using GPGTools

After installing GPGTools, you should be able to follow the instruction for Linux with the command line. To open the command line, navigate to your Applications folder, open Utilities, and double click on Terminal.

So how can I better check the ISO image authenticity?

The Tails signing key that you downloaded from this website could be a fake one if you were victim of a man-in-the-middle attack.

Finding a way of trusting better Tails signing key would allow you to authenticate better the ISO image you downloaded. The following page will give you hints on how to increase the trust you can put in the Tails signing key you downloaded:

Stay tuned

It's very important to keep your version of Tails up-to-date, otherwise your system will be vulnerable to numerous security holes.

To be notified of new versions and important project news, follow our news feed or subscribe to our news mailing list:

Installation