This is about #11162.

External resources about personas

Data sources

Archive of the process

Collective brainstorming in August 2016

Use cases:

  • A small group of English-speaking journalists use Tails to analyze an archive of leaked documents and prepare articles about them.

  • A well-established music teacher uses Tails to bypass the software and network limitations on their professional laptop.

  • Someone living in a controlled housing uses Tails to avoid having all their Internet browsing monitored by the staff.

  • A political scientist in Egypt uses Tails to send their findings to Germany while avoiding State surveillance.

  • A woman who lives with someone abusing her uses Tails to communicate stealthily and without living traces on the home computer.

  • A political activist uses Tails to coordinate with their affinity group and organize a demonstration.

  • A person suffering from cancer uses Tails to learn about their disease while avoiding their employer learning about their condition.

  • A group of people preparing a plea for defending activists in court uses Tails to prepare the plea and store the documents in a safe place.

  • A free software contributor uses Tails to translate the security tools used by their community into Bahasa Indonesia.

  • A whistle-blower uses Tails to store and edit to-be-leaked documents securely.

  • A lawyer uses Tails to communicate with their client in a secure and anonymous fashion.

  • A Tails developer uses Tails to develop Tails and understand better the struggling of users.

  • A university student uses Tails to publish publicly-funded but copyrighted scientific papers online.

  • Union workers use Tails to coordinate about labor struggle over their company's network.

  • A Russian tourist uses Tails to access their online bank account without getting their credential stolen.

  • A nomadic person with no personal laptop uses Tails to carry the same computing environment and personal documents around.

  • A abuse contact uses Tails in order to communicate with survivors contacting them.

  • A person without their own Internet access uses Tails to use an uncensored Internet.

  • A teenager uses Tails to escape parental control filter.

  • A group of people use Tails to write a book together and publish it.

  • A scientist uses Tails to report and transcribe interviews while preserving the personal identifying information of the interviewees.

  • Webmasters of a cop-watching website use Tails to reduce their chance of being caught while reporting on police violence.

  • A photographer uses Tails to store and work on pictures before publication.

  • A person without the need for a big storage uses Tails as their main operating system to have more privacy.

Collective process from August 2017

Summary of a 2 hours session we did with 12 core contributors.

This process is inspired by the workshop described in The Essential Persona Lifecycle by Tamara Adlin and John Pruitt, Chapter 4 Persona conception and gestation.

  • General explanation of what personas are and why they are useful (15')

  • Everybody prepares, in silent, sticky notes describing a user and their goal. (15')

    For example:

    • "Women that go through domestic violence and wants to escape from that."
    • "Webmasters of a sensitive website that wants to hack on it."
  • All together we assimilate these sticky notes and the ones identified in August 2016 by types of users. (30')

    We start with predefined categories based on last year's output and adding new ones or splitting existing ones as needed. There should be no more than 10 stick notes per category.

    • Predefined categories:

      • Activist
      • Censorship evader
      • Contributor
      • Darknet customer
      • Information freedom fighter
      • Nomadic
      • Privacy geek
      • Surveilled at home
    • Final categories:

      • Activist
      • Censorship evader
      • Contributor
      • Darknet customer
      • Evil people
      • Information freedom fighter
      • Journalist or researcher
      • Law enforcement
      • Nomadic
      • People helping others in shit
      • People we don't want to help
      • Privacy geek
      • Sensitive content creator
      • Surveilled at home
      • Surveilled at work
  • The facilitator takes pictures of the resulting assimilation and removes the user categories.

  • All together we assimilate again the same stick notes and group them by user goals (45').

    User goals are short sentences starting with "I want..." or "I need...". There should be no more than 10 stick notes per category. Sticky notes that fit in more than one goal can be duplicated.

  • All together we summarize these goals by identifying main goals and subgoals. (10')

    See "User goals for using Tails" below.

User goals for using Tails

A. I want to hide information about myself

  • I want to keep information secret from my government
  • I want to keep information secret from my family and close people
  • I want to access sensitive information stealthily
  • I want to hide my identity
  • I want to hide my location
  • I don't want to raise suspicion

B. I want to communicate and collaborate securely

  • I want to communicate securely with known peers
  • I want to communicate securely with unknown peers
  • I want to communicate with others who are under surveillance
  • We want to share and work on documents privately

C. I want to store information safely

  • I need to safely store my data
  • I want to edit or anonymize my data

D. I want to leave no trace on the computer

  • I need to use a computer that is not mine

E. I want information to be free

  • I want to access censored information online
  • I want to publish sensitive information

F. I don't want my data to be gathered by corporations and governments

  • I want to understand people using Tails
  • I just want more privacy

Personas

Our framework includes holistic security and threat modeling information based on the Personas Framework for Internet Freedom developed by SecondMuse:

  • Name (genderneutral)
  • Occupation
  • Background
  • Motivations
  • Challenges and threats
  • Communications
  • Goals
  • Use cases
  • Definition of security
  • Key Technologies used regularly
    • Features used in Tails
    • Features used outside of Tails
  • Threat perception
  • Security precautions

Kim, The Surveilled at Home (16-19)

Background

  • Is living in a very religious family in the US.

  • Tried to come out as trans to their family in the past but they don't believe them and think they are just a complicated teenager.

  • Tried to run away in the past and since then their family is controlling their movements and relationships.

  • Has a violent father.

  • Is going to a religious school which is aware of the situation and keeps a close eye on them.

Motivations

  • Is searching for help and support groups online and also tries to find solidarity.

  • Is planning to escape their family for good and reach a safe house.

  • Wants to feel safe.

  • Wants to avoid surveillance from their family and school.

  • Doesn't want to leave traces on the shared computer and prefers to hide their identity by accessing information stealthily.

Challenges and threats

  • Their mobile phone and the computers in the family are monitored.

  • Computers at school are monitored.

  • Doesn't have their own computer and sometimes borrow the computer from their older sister.

  • Can't meet with support groups openly and has to do it online.

  • Has limited time when using computers.

  • Is worried about saving information safely.

  • Needs to know keyboard shortcuts for switching applications in case somebody walks behind them.

  • Needs safe storage for email addresses and nicknames.

  • Needs access to books online.

  • Needs to use a pseudonym.

  • Needs a stealth or dedicated email address.

  • Needs to document abuses in their family and school and keep it safe.

Communications

  • Online support groups: forums, websites.

  • Known peers: chat, email.

  • Unknown peers: chat, email, forums.

  • Psychologist and solidarity groups online: forums, websites.

Primary goals

A. I want to hide information about myself

  • I want to keep information secret from my family and close people
  • I want to access sensitive information stealthily
  • I want to hide my identity
  • I want to hide my location
  • I don't want to raise suspicion

D. I want to leave no trace on the computer

  • I need to use a computer that is not mine

Secondary goals

B. I want to communicate and collaborate securely

  • I want to communicate securely with known peers
  • I want to communicate securely with unknown peers

C. I want to store information safely

  • I need to safely store my data

E. I want information to be free

  • I want to access censored information online

References

Cris, The Information Gatherer (50-60)

Background

  • Is a Mexican journalist living in the United States for their safety.

  • Is doing high-stakes investigation on the government, the mafia, and drug related trafficking and corruption.

  • Is visiting Mexico to interview locals and needs to get out of the country with the collected information and media safely.

  • Needs to communicate with journalistic partners and sources and to protect these communications as well as the identity of their interview partners.

  • Needs to store and edit the collected information safely. They also need to keep metadata in order to prove the evidence.

  • Needs to send big videos files over the Internet for somebody else to edit it.

Motivations

  • Publish information about corrupted politicians and harm they did.

  • Bring them in front of a court.

Challenges and threats

  • Access information.

  • Hide what they are working on until it's made public.

  • Research stealthily by visiting journalists.

  • Bring information outside of the country.

Communications

  • Local interviewees: leaking platform, mobile phone messaging.

  • Journalistic partners: emails, mobile phone messaging.

  • Publication: websites, cloud storage.

Primary goals

B. I want to communicate and collaborate securely

  • I want to communicate securely with known peers
  • I want to communicate securely with unknown peers
  • I want to communicate with others who are under surveillance
  • We want to share and work on documents privately

C. I want to store information safely

  • I need to safely store my data
  • I want to edit or anonymize my data

Secondary goals

A. I want to hide information about myself

  • I want to keep information secret from my government
  • I want to access sensitive information stealthily
  • I want to hide my identity
  • I want to hide my location

E. I want information to be free

  • I want to publish sensitive information

References

Riou, The Censorship Evader (20-30)

Background

  • Is a social science student in Hanoi.

  • Is part of a group organizing a public massive protest against new government policies and laws.

  • Is considered to be quite tech-savvy by others in their group though they never really studied computer science.

  • Wants to be stealthy and anonymous, but the protest needs to be public and advertised.

  • Their group needs to send out strategic information to the public so that citizens actually know where to show up.

  • In order to publish this information, their group uses websites which are not hosted on servers within the country, so that the government cannot shut them down but these websites are censored within the country.

  • Their group uses social media: Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, etc.

  • Their group doesn't trust the local press but sometimes interacts pseudonymously with the international press or the Vietnamese diaspora (on social media, over email, etc.).

  • Their group is doing most of their communication beforehand.

  • During the protest, leaves their phones at home and use devices that are not theirs (burner phones, cameras, etc.), so that they can hide their involvement in the organization of this protest.

  • After the protest, their group tries to publish text and images about the protest as soon as possible.

Motivations

  • Wants to lead social change in their country without being put themselves under the spotlight.

  • Wants information to be free in their country: they want to speak freely and they want others to have access to uncensored information.

Challenges and threats

  • Use networks.

  • Access information online.

  • Use applications that the government is not monitoring.

  • Use mesh applications.

  • Help others access censored information; for example by teaching people anti-censorship technologies.

Communications

  • Internal communications: chat, encrypted emails.

  • External communications: censored websites.

Primary goal

E. I want information to be free

  • I want to access censored information online
  • I want to publish sensitive information

Secondary goals

A. I want to hide information about myself

  • I want to keep information secret from my government
  • I want to hide my identity
  • I want to hide my location
  • I don't want to raise suspicion

B. I want to communicate and collaborate securely

  • I want to communicate securely with known peers
  • I want to communicate securely with unknown peers

References

Derya, The Privacy Advocate (30-40)

Background

  • Works for an e-commence company in Lebanon.

  • Is very privacy conscious. They use only free software on their personal computer but at work their job is to optimize sells by analyzing what people buy most and why.

  • Knows more than average about computers and the Internet but has no strong technical background.

  • Often gives digital security advice to friends in Lebanon and to other people online in Arabic and Turkish.

  • Sometimes contributes to free software projects in their free time. For example, they translate lots of software into Arabic and Turkish.

  • Does a lot of trekking and backpacking around the world.

  • Has some bitcoins for fun, speculation, and a bit of tax-free business.

Motivations

  • Is outraged by all kinds of privacy violations and knows that everybody is watched upon in one way or another.

  • Wants to know everything about how online surveillance works and is always learning new privacy-preserving technologies.

  • Wants to contribute to free software projects from their place of work.

  • Wants to write on his blog, access his emails, and use other people's computer safely while traveling.

Challenges and threats

  • Staying up-to-date with privacy tools and knowing how to explain them to others.

  • Getting busted by their boss or colleagues while taking some time off their work.

Communications

  • Free software contribution: encrypted and unencrypted emails and chat.

  • While traveling: emails and social media.

Primary goal

F. I don't want my data to be gathered by corporations and governments

  • I want to understand people using Tails
  • I just want more privacy

Secondary goals

D. I want to leave no trace on the computer

  • I need to use a computer that is not mine

E. I want information to be free

  • I want to access censored information online